How to Store Bridal Wear?

Hello all!

I’m working on the next post – our Mata ki Chowki.

But I had a question I am hoping someone will know the answer to:

How do you store bridal net dupattas? Mine are heavy with kundan work on them. Im scared that the net will crack if I keep it folded up or the kundan will go black. Any tips?

Advertisements

How I found my Sagan Outfit

For the Sagan ceremony, I had my heart set on the famous Katrina lehenga. I even loved the colours that it originally came in – shell pink with cream and silver.

 Image

I had conveyed this request to the in-laws because they were the ones who were getting me the outfit. However, I was a wee bit disappointed to see just how famous that lehenga had gotten!! Replicas were everywhere, and so the originality factor was zero.   

So I made up my mind to have a look at what was out there. The family took me out shopping last week on Navmi: A, Mom-in-law, Dad-in-law and me, their “to-be daughter in law”, and off we went to Karol Bagh. At this point, I was thinking about one-piece dresses, but continued to keep the Katrina lehenga as a back—up. 

The first few stores we visited had only lehengas and saris – no dresses, and so we walked out. After leaving the 3rd shop empty handed I started to feel a little conscious of the fact that I had my in-laws with me, and I really didn’t want to seem like a demanding girl. However, I really didn’t want to compromise on the dress either!

We stopped my shopping for a bit because we came across Gujrals. A’s and my father-in law’s Sagan outfits were selected here. As we left the shop and were walking around, the clouds gathered, and it started raining, quite heavily.  We ran to the nearest store – guided by A, and it turned out to be Frontier (smiles, smiles).

Here I found what I was looking for! And it was not the Katrina lehenga. After trying on about 6 – 7 dresses, I finally chose a beautiful, floaty net one in rose pink. It had delicate antique work all over the bodice reaching down, and had a huge ‘ghera’.  I felt like a princess wearing it!

Since it was being made-to-order, I got the colour changed to red. The wedding lehenga is a riot of colours but has fuchsia as it’s base, so I did not want to repeat the pink factor here.  Stonework changes to red from pink, and everything else remains the same.

When they heard that I needed the delivery in just about 3 weeks, the shop assistants balked and said the delivery could not be completed on time. Thankfully, a bit (or rather quite a lot) of coaxing changed their minds, and my measurements were taken.

The delivery date is set for 2 days before the Sagan – can’t wait to see how it turns out! Shopping for this outfit turned out to be a memorable experience – the romance of the rainy weather was perfect, and it was like Frontier just beckoned – thankfully, I heeded!

 Image

P.S – shopping with your in-laws is the best way to break the ice and get more comfortable! Bonding over kulfi at Roshans’ really helped me settle down 🙂

 

 

The Hunt for the Wedding Lehenga

I always had this secret doubt about wedding lehenga shopping: that I would not fall in love with a lehenga, and would have to compromise on what I would be wearing at the wedding.

Thankfully, thankfully, I now know what it is like to fall in love with your wedding lehenga!

I would like to thank peachesandblush and thedelhibride, through whom I came to know of Om Prakash Jawahar Lal in Chandni Chowk.

So how does one fall in love with a lehenga? It is a mixture of love at first sight and love at first trial. When we sat upstairs in the shop on the white cotton mattresses, there were heaps of lehengas lying all around – and they were all awesome. I had a huge grin on my face because I just knew that something WILL click here. Before here, and after as well, I had seen other lehengas – all the same: net with zari or stonework with satin or something similar underneath. Blah!

I also had reservations with the colour red. First of all – too common; second – I felt like a red lehenga would age me. Shades of pink suit me and “my” colour has always been fuchsia, so it was expected that the heaps of pink would catch my eye.  I remember excitedly looking around and I couldn’t wait to have all these awesome lehengas shown to me.

Finally we were settled, and the lehengas were brought out. Out of the ones that were shown to me, I selected about 5 that were put aside, which were then draped on me by the shop assistants. The first one I had chosen turned out to be extremely heavy, and so I put that aside. The other few were good but not great, and so I sat back down.

There was this one particular lehenga that I had glanced over but not selected. My Mom asked for that to be shown. In the meantime, I spied this gorgeous chunni in a very unique colour sitting in a heap and so I asked for that. It turned out that the chunni was for the lehenga that my Mom had asked for. When it was draped on me, it looked awesome! But due to the unique colour of the chunni, it did not look bridal. The problem was solved by the double dupatta drape – bridal colour on head, and the splash of colour on my shoulder. I had secretly wanted a double dupatta lehenga, so it all fit right into place and when the draping was completed on me, I beamed – here was my very unique, very pretty lehenga I was looking for: I had finally found it!

After falling in love with the piece, we actually left without ordering it because I felt like I hadn’t seen enough options. However, your first love always has a special place in your heart. I did look around some more, but the uniqueness of that lehenga was unmatched, and so I went back after 5 days to order it.

I almost had a heart attack when I was told that I was too late to order it now and that their workers would not be able to complete it on time. However, the shop owner soon persuaded them, and my lehenga delivery date is now set for 3 days before the wedding. We are cutting it really close at this point, but that’s what happens when you walk in to order your bridal lehenga less than a month before the wedding.

I can’t wait to pick up the lehenga and say “Welcome home!”